Category Archives: books

HW Pick: “Astoria” John Jacob Astor Expedition To The North Pole

astoria the bookAstoria is the thrilling, true-adventure tale of the 1810 Astor Expedition, an epic, now forgotten, three-year journey to forge an American empire on the Pacific Coast, spearheaded by John Jacob Astor (from the same family that brought you Astor Place in Harlem), with support from Thomas Jefferson (another Harlem visitor). Continue reading

Join Lisa Bloom and Marc Lamont Hill ‘Suspicion Nation’ Discusses Book in Harlem

New_HostRead what people have to say about Suspicion Nation:

“Lisa Bloom brings her expert legal eye to the lethal cocktail of racial inequality, ludicrously outdated gun laws, and a culture of violence that led to the senseless killing of an unarmed seventeen–year-old boy. Read this book, get angry, and demand change.”Piers Morgan, host of Piers Morgan Live Continue reading

Souleo: More Than Enough White Children’s Books?

King for a Day_by Rukhsana Khan and illustrated by Christiane Krömer_Courtesy of LEE & LOW BOO KSA young boy fights bullying while celebrating Basant, a springtime kite-flying festival in “King For A Day.” A group of kids transform their bodies into the letters A-Z in “AFRO-BETS ABC Book.” Continue reading

Supporting Organizations That Support Black Writers

medger evers photoI am a black writer, who is now, hoping/working for a career as an author. Though my drive was fueled by passion and not money, now I am hoping for this to become a lucrative career. Book Publishing is a business, and I hope to earn money, lots of it. Continue reading

Harlem’s Prima Ballerina, Misty Copeland Signs

misty2n-3

By Tod Roulette

My  ten-year-old goddaughter Lucy is all legs and arms. She sat on my lap at the Upper East Side Barnes and Noble on 86th Street this week waiting to see thirty-one-year old African-American prima ballerina Misty Copeland of the American Ballet Theater. Continue reading

Maroon Slaves Discussed At The Schomburg

sylviane-dioufThe little-known history of the maroons, slaves who escaped from their plantations and set up secret communities in the swamps, is coming to Harlem. Continue reading

A’Lelia Bundles At The Schomburg

ALelia-Bundles-Hurst-Join author A’Lelia Bundles for a conversation about Joy Goddess of Harlem, her forthcoming biography about her great-grandmother, A’Lelia Walker. Bundles will also share rarely seen vintage photographs and memorabilia with a focus on A’Lelia Walker’s life, parties, friends, and arts patronage in Harlem.  Continue reading

HW Pick: Pete Rose, An American Dilemma

Pete Rose CoverIn a sports intense Harlem, Pete Rose: An American Dilemma sounds like a good read. Pete Rose is the ultimate enigma—to baseball fans, to historians and journalists, to ballplayers past and present and even to members of his own family. Continue reading

Up the Book Staircase (‘Paris Blues Revisited’)

Albert Murray,

By K

Albert Murray, acclaimed essayist and author of several novels including Train. Whistle. Guitar has those floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that loom over you, hinting at timelessness. My acquaintance with his famed Harlem apartment is secondhand, but I’ve seen those shelves. Continue reading

Books: The Tastemaker, Carl Van Vechten and the Birth of Modern America

tastemakerThe Tastemaker explores the many lives of Carl Van Vechten, the most influential cultural impresario of the early twentieth century: a patron and dealmaker of the Harlem Renaissance, a photographer who captured the era’s icons, and a novelist who created some of the Jazz Age’s most salacious stories. Continue reading

Today’s Black Literary World With Omar Tyree (Part 2)

Omar Tyree 2By Eartha Watts Hicks

We continue with the three part interview with Omar Tyree that started in February during Black History month and now continues in March 2014. Continue reading

Today’s Black Literary World With Omar Tyree (Part 1)

Omar Tyree

By Eartha Watts-Hicks

In the 1990s, thanks to the cross-cultural success of Terry McMillan’s legendary and timeless novel—Waiting to Exhale—the publishing industry finally woke up and welcomed contemporary African-American writers into their doors. Continue reading