Kass Fashion Report: Harlem Renaissance Style

Harlem Renaissance 4By Kass

The Harlem Renaissance speaks to a beautiful time period in American history, specifically black American history. The Harlem Renaissance birthed, cultivated and celebrated African-American cultural and artistic contributions to the U.S. creative and cultural art sectors. Continue Reading →

“When the Moon Turns Green: the Myth and Music of Billie Holiday” Free At HarlemStage

1d128fdb-6edf-41e3-a1fb-db2f811a0458Dr. Robert O’Meally, author of Lady Day: The Many Faces of Billie Holiday, Dr. Farah Jasmin Griffin, author of If You Can’t Be Free, Be A Mystery and Dr. John Szwed, author of the forthcoming Billie Holiday: Continue Reading →

Live: “Count” ‘Basie & The Blues’ With The Eric Reed Ensemble (streaming)

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Have fave William James “Count” Basie established 4/4 swing as one of jazz’s predominant styles and solidified the link between jazz and the blues. Continue Reading →

A Harlem Throwback To The Era Of Billie Holiday

harlem bbop makes come backAround 8 p.m. on a recent Saturday, a few dozen people were gathered in a narrow, dimly lit Harlem brownstone. Couples smoked in the backyard beneath Christmas lights; a group of Chilean expats sought a corkscrew; a man and his young son searched for seats. Continue Reading →

Apollo Theaters Gordon “Doc” Anderson And Billie Holiday, 1950’s

Apollo Theaters Bob Anderson And Billie Holiday 1940sApollo Theater house photographer Gordon Anderson laughs it up with diva Billie Holiday, behind-the-scenes at the Apollo Theater, In Harlem, New York, 1950’s. Continue Reading →

Diddy’s Harlem Initiative To Benefit the Boys & Girls Club

diddy revoltToday, REVOLT TV announced a new community initiative, HELLO Harlem, designed to raise interest, awareness and support for the Boys & Girls Club of Harlem (BGCH). Continue Reading →

Billie Holiday Sings ‘Strange Fruit,’ Harlem, 1939 (audio)

Billie_HolidayStrange Fruit” is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday (lived in Harlem during this time), who first sang and recorded it in 1939. Written by the teacher Abel Meeropol as a poem, it exposed American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. Continue Reading →