Uncle Luke Calls Al Sharpton “A Double Agent…”

alsharptonunclelukePolitical pundit and long-time civil rights activist Al Shaprton has been under fire this month after documents hit the internet proving his former role as an FBI informant. Continue Reading →

Harlem State Of Mind: Debut Of “A Haunted House 2″

marlon-wayansOur friends in Chi-Town with a Harlem State of Mind sent us this post about Tuesday night opening with funny man Marlon Wayans celebrated the debut of his upcoming film, “A Haunted House 2″ at the Hubbard Inn in Chicago, with Hennessy Black and Michigan Avenue. Continue Reading →

Frankie Knuckles House Pioneer Passes (video)

knucklesWe wish it was an April Fool’s joke, but it’s not – Frankie Knuckles, Chicago house legend, has died aged 59. Continue Reading →

Chandler Owen, Harlem, 1916-

200446_1788648047791_7638577_nChandler Owen (1889–1967) was an African-American writer, editor and early member of the Socialist Party of America. Born in North Carolina, he studied and worked in New York, then moved to Chicago for much of his career. Continue Reading →

HW Pick: George Coleman Quartet At Smoke

37th Annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Presented by Shell - Donald Harrison with George Coleman and Eddie Palmieri - May 6, 2006As part of the Smoke in Harlem’s 15th anniversary celebration Saxophonist George Coleman, a musician of rare genius, is making some of the most inspired music of his long career. Continue Reading →

Whistle In Mississippi In Harlem

downloadIn 1955, Emmett and his cousin, both from Chicago, went to visit family in Mississippi…according to several versions, Emmett whistled at a white woman and others say he grabbed her hand and asked for a date; others say all he did was say “Bye, baby” as he left the store. Continue Reading →

Black Fives History Of Basketball At The New York Historical Society

The Black Fives exhibition (on view at the New-York Historical Society March 14 — July 20, 2014) will explore the pioneering history of the African American basketball teams that existed in New York City and elsewhere from the early 1900s through 1950, the year the National Basketball Association became racially integrated. Continue Reading →