Harlem Hospital April 18, 1887

When Harlem Hospital Center opened its doors on April 18, 1887, the physical plant consisted of a leased, three-story wooden building, it was located at the juncture of East 120th Street and the East River. Continue Reading →

‘Under the Radar’ Art Series with Lenore Brown

El CoquiBarbara Russell, the curator for the Under the Radar Art Series, is very happy to feature Lenore Browne’s photographic work during the New Year because her work has the same elegance and distinction as a glass of New Years Eve champagne. Continue Reading →

The New Harlem Hospital, NY 1912

harlem hospital 1912The first Harlem Hospital, opened at the junction of 120th Street and the East River in 1887. By 1903, construction had begun on a new Harlem Hospital on the east side of Lenox Avenue between 136th and 137th streets in central Harlem. Continue Reading →

Twenty Two West (“22 West”)

“22 West” was the name of the Harlem Restaurant – Bar – Jazz Club – Gallery & Banquet Room, that was located at 22W.135th St., between 5th and Lenox in Manhattan. Continue Reading →

Pat Crowe, “Harlem Outlaw,” Died In Harlem Hospital In 1921

05583u.previewPat Crowe, the ex-convict who lectured in Hagerstown several years ago on the theme that “Crime Doesn’t Pay,” died Saturday in a New York hospital, aged 79. Continue Reading →

Dr. May Edward Chinn The First African-American Woman Physician

Dr. May Edward Chinn (April 15, 1896 – December 1, 1980) was an African-American woman physician. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital Medical College and the first African-American woman to intern at Harlem Hospital. In her private practice, she provided care for patients who would not otherwise receive treatment due to racism or classism. Later in her career, she performed pioneering research on cancer, helping to develop the Pap smear test for cervical cancer.Chinn was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Her father, William Lafayette, was the son of a plantation slave and her owner; at the age of 11, he escaped from this Virginia plantation. Her mother, Lulu Ann, was the daughter of a slave and a Chickahominy Native American. She worked as the live-in cook at the Long Island mansion of the Tiffany family of jewelers, who treated Chinn as a family member. Growing up, she attended musical concerts in New York City and learned to play piano, accompanying the singer Paul Robeson in the early 1920s. The Tiffany family also taught her the German and French languages. Continue Reading →