A Harlem Throwback To The Era Of Billie Holiday

harlem bbop makes come backAround 8 p.m. on a recent Saturday, a few dozen people were gathered in a narrow, dimly lit Harlem brownstone. Couples smoked in the backyard beneath Christmas lights; a group of Chilean expats sought a corkscrew; a man and his young son searched for seats. Continue Reading →

Harlem Experiences: Get an Harlem Insider’s Look At Book Spaces, Places And People With An Author

harlem-renaissance-bookWe at Harlem World naturally aim to keep that Harlem Renaissance spirit alive whenever possible: experience its legendary birthplace, where so many giants such as James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay,

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The Langston Hughes Festival Celebrates Walter Mosley

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Join the Langston Hughes Festival & The City College of New York Honor Award Winning Detective Fiction writer Walter Mosley the Best-selling mystery writer Walter Mosley will receive the 2014 Langston Hughes Medal at The City College of New York in Harlem. Continue Reading →

Book: Josephine Baker And The Rainbow Tribe

harlem world magazine josehp bookCreating a sensation with her risqué nightclub act and strolls down the Champs Elysées, pet cheetah in tow, the Missouri born Josephine Baker lives on in popular memory as the during the Harlem Renaissance, became a muse for Harlem’s Langston Hughes banana-skirted siren of Jazz Age Paris. Continue Reading →

Harlem Business Innovation Summit 2014: Disrupt Harlem

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Join the 11th Annual Harlem Business Innovation Summit 2014: Disrupt Harlem: One Entrepreneur at a Time, moderated by Kimberly Foster, with Julia Collins, Adarsh Alphons, Bruce Lincoln and Clayton Banks, Errol King, and Aaron Saunders. Continue Reading →

Anita Thompson, Harlem’s American Cocktail Girl, 1920’s

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Langston Hughes was a cousin; Booker T. Washington was a friend; Bill “Bojangles” Robinson taught her tap dance; W. E .B. du Bois a likely first lover…

Contemporary ‘It girls’ have nothing on the free spirits of the 1920s like Anita Thompson Dickinson Reynolds, who danced the Charleston, turned cartwheels on the sidewalk, and drank gin blossoms till dawn. Continue Reading →

Books: The Tastemaker, Carl Van Vechten and the Birth of Modern America

tastemakerThe Tastemaker explores the many lives of Carl Van Vechten, the most influential cultural impresario of the early twentieth century: a patron and dealmaker of the Harlem Renaissance, a photographer who captured the era’s icons, and a novelist who created some of the Jazz Age’s most salacious stories. Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Renaissance Casino, 1924

Harlem Renassance BallroomThe Harlem Renaissance Ballroom opened in 1923. The casino was built by the black-owned Sarco Realty Company. The Ballroom at 138th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard, quaked with the frenzied rhythms of the Lindy Hop. Continue Reading →

HW Pick: Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man

Ralph_Ellison_from_wikimediaThe Studio Museum in Harlem and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture are pleased to announce a major collaboration celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of America’s greatest writers, Ralph Ellison. On Saturday, March 1, 2014—a century after Ellison’s birth in Oklahoma City—Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man will kick off a year of programs and initiatives celebrating the Ellison Centennial. Continue Reading →

Carl Van Vechten’s Harlem Color

Sanneh01Ella Fitzgerald, 1940

In “White Mischief,” in this week’s issue of the New Yorker magazine, Kelefa Sanneh writes about Carl Van Vechten, a “New York hipster and literary gadabout” who was an unlikely champion of the African-American experience as it unfolded on the streets of Harlem in the nineteen-twenties. Continue Reading →

WQXR Host And Harlemite Terrance McKnight Celebrates Black History

TerranceMcKnight1_byMarcoAntonio_WNYC_PORTRAITS_2514_300dpiMusic—jazz, gospel, R&B, and hip-hop in Harlem—has been a crucial vehicle of African American cultural expression, but the contributions to classical music by people of African descent is rarely given its due. Continue Reading →