Harlem Business Innovation Summit 2014: Disrupt Harlem

disrupt harlem

Join the 11th Annual Harlem Business Innovation Summit 2014: Disrupt Harlem: One Entrepreneur at a Time, moderated by Kimberly Foster, with Julia Collins, Adarsh Alphons, Bruce Lincoln and Clayton Banks, Errol King, and Aaron Saunders. Continue Reading →

HW Pick: “Celebrate Sonia!” The 80th Birthday Celebration for Sis. Sonia Sanchez

sonia-sanchez.562.325.cDon’t miss Celebrate Sonia!  The Schomburg is teaming up with the Center for Black Literature; AKILA WORKSONGS; Arts+Crafts, Inc.; and African Voices Magazine to throw a special birthday party for the beloved world renowned poet, humanitarian, scholar, and activist .  Continue Reading →

In Celebration of the Life of Maya Angelou In Harlem

mayaThe family of Dr. Maya Angelou, Random House, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Center for Black Literature invite you to a Celebration of the Life of Maya Angelou. Continue Reading →

‘I Found God In Myself’, The 40th Anniversary Of Ntozake Shange’s “For Colored Girls…”

40th anniversary celebration

Check out the ‘I Found God In Myself’, The 40th Anniversary Of Ntozake Shange’s “For Colored Girls…” at the Schomburg Center Latimer/Edison Gallery, in Harlem, NY. Continue Reading →

Freedom Summer At The Schomburg In Harlem

schomburg in harlemVeteran Director Stanley Nelson captures the volatile months of the 1964 Freedom Summer through remarkable period footage and the firsthand testimonies of volunteers who were transformed by their time in Mississippi. Continue Reading →

LGBTQ Cultures in Photography At The Schomburg

June-9-Visually-Speaking-Gerad-Gaskin-image Join the Schomburg as we celebrate LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning) culture through the images of photographers Gerad Gaskin and Samantha Box. Continue Reading →

No Longer Empty’s Show “If You Build It” In Harlem

art in harlemOn our 5-year anniversary of presenting site-specific art, No Longer Empty’s exhibition “If You Build It” takes root in Sugar Hill—the legendary epicenter of the Harlem Renaissance. Continue Reading →