Book: Josephine Baker And The Rainbow Tribe

harlem world magazine josehp bookCreating a sensation with her risqué nightclub act and strolls down the Champs Elysées, pet cheetah in tow, the Missouri born Josephine Baker lives on in popular memory as the during the Harlem Renaissance, became a muse for Harlem’s Langston Hughes banana-skirted siren of Jazz Age Paris. Continue Reading →

Anita Thompson, Harlem’s American Cocktail Girl, 1920’s

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Langston Hughes was a cousin; Booker T. Washington was a friend; Bill “Bojangles” Robinson taught her tap dance; W. E .B. du Bois a likely first lover…

Contemporary ‘It girls’ have nothing on the free spirits of the 1920s like Anita Thompson Dickinson Reynolds, who danced the Charleston, turned cartwheels on the sidewalk, and drank gin blossoms till dawn. Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Jay And Grace Clifford, ‘Mr. and Mrs. Society,’ 1930’s

jay of Harlem and wifeBlackExPat wrote that Jay Clifford, who was born in 1887, and married his wife Grace in the early 1900’s. He and his wife threw huge parties in Harlem during the 1930s, so much so that they became known as ‘Mr. and Mrs. Society.’ Continue Reading →

George Mingo at Essie Green Galleries In Harlem

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A Conversation With George Mingo

Interviewing George Mingo about his work is very stimulating indeed. The closer one gets to this artist, the more disconcerting and surprising he becomes. Continue Reading →

Up the Book Staircase (‘Paris Blues Revisited’)

Albert Murray,

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Albert Murray, acclaimed essayist and author of several novels including Train. Whistle. Guitar has those floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that loom over you, hinting at timelessness. My acquaintance with his famed Harlem apartment is secondhand, but I’ve seen those shelves. Continue Reading →

Shadows Uplifted: The Rise Of African Amercian Artist At Swann Galleries

Malvin Gray Johnson Along the Harlem RiverOn Thursday, February 13, Swann Galleries’ African-American Fine Art department will offer a curated auction titled Shadows Uplifted, which highlights the development of African-American artists in the 19th century and early 20th century. Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Eugene Jacques Bullard, The First African American Fighter Pilot

Eugene Jacques Bullard (1894-1961) was the first African American to fly a fighter plane and was known as the “black swallow of death” for his courage during missions. He led a colorful life, much of it in Europe. Continue Reading →