Williana “Liane” Jones Burroughs, Harlem

Burroughs-Williana-1933Williana “Liane” Jones Burroughs (1882–1945) was an American teacher, communist political activist, and politician. She is best remembered as one of the first African-American women to run for elective office in New York. Continue Reading →

Carl Van Vechten’s Harlem Color

Sanneh01Ella Fitzgerald, 1940

In “White Mischief,” in this week’s issue of the New Yorker magazine, Kelefa Sanneh writes about Carl Van Vechten, a “New York hipster and literary gadabout” who was an unlikely champion of the African-American experience as it unfolded on the streets of Harlem in the nineteen-twenties. Continue Reading →

Marcus Garvey In His Harlem Office, 1914

390456_321136221247341_1907102897_nMarcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr., ONH (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940), was a Jamaican political leader, publisher, journalist, entrepreneur, and orator who was a staunch proponent of the Black nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL). Continue Reading →

Harlemite, Danny Glover Receives Harlem Arts Alliance’s Humanitarian Award 2012

Each time actor and activist Danny Glover passes the 135th Street YMCA, he reminisces of the days that the cultural hub used to host and house Harlem Renaissance writers such as Langston Hughes and W.E.B. Du Bois, and actors such as Ossie Davis and Paul Robeson. Continue Reading →

Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance: A Portrait in Black and White

Carl Van Vechten was a white man with a passion for blackness who played a crucial role in helping the Harlem Renaissance, a black movement, come to understand itself. Continue Reading →

Sugar Hill In Harlem

View An Overview of the Harlem Neighborhoods in a larger map

Sugar Hill is a historic district in the northern part of the Hamilton Heights section of Harlem in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Continue Reading →