HW Pick: ‘Draped Down’ At Studio Museum In Harlem

draped down at studio museum in harlemIn 1942, cultural anthropologist and novelist Zora Neale Hurston listed the term “draped down” as one of several terms meaning “well-dressed” in a glossary of Harlem Renaissance -era slang. Continue Reading →

Carl Van Vechten’s Harlem Color

Sanneh01Ella Fitzgerald, 1940

In “White Mischief,” in this week’s issue of the New Yorker magazine, Kelefa Sanneh writes about Carl Van Vechten, a “New York hipster and literary gadabout” who was an unlikely champion of the African-American experience as it unfolded on the streets of Harlem in the nineteen-twenties. Continue Reading →

The Niggerati Manor In Harlem

Niggerati Manor In HarlemThe Niggerati was the name used, with deliberate irony, by Wallace Thurman for the group of young African American artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance. “Niggerati” is a portmanteau of “nigger” and “literati”. Continue Reading →

Gay Pride Month: Harlem’s LGBT Icons

President Obama’s recent endorsement of same sex marriage has been a huge triumph in both the LGBT and black community. Continue Reading →

A Harlem Renaissance Suitcase Duffle For Dad

This Italian made calf-skin leather, trimmed with smart contrast stitching, and brass hardware bag is perfect for Dad. With a flash back to Harlem renaissance styling and a new wheelie trolly underneath is the perfect staycation for him and mom. Continue Reading →

Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance: A Portrait in Black and White

Carl Van Vechten was a white man with a passion for blackness who played a crucial role in helping the Harlem Renaissance, a black movement, come to understand itself. Continue Reading →

Sponsored Love: Music of the Harlem Renaissance with pianist Randy Weston at The Greene Space in SoHo

Continue Reading →

Harlem’s Drag Ball History

Numerous historians and cultural commentators have traced the origins of today’s house ball scene to the notorious culture of Harlem drag balls in 1920′s and 1930′s New York. Continue Reading →

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston in (we hope) Harlem.Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. In 2002, scholar Molefi Kete Asante listed Zora Neale Hurston on his list of 100 Greatest African Americans. Continue Reading →